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Drinkaware

Wine List > France > Bordeaux > Bordeaux Red
2010 Chapelle de Potensac
France, Bordeaux, Red
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Case of 12   £90.00 
Quantity:

Chapelle de Potensac, Médoc, Bordeaux


Country:France
Region:Bordeaux
Appellation:Médoc
Colour:Red
Vintage: 2010
Size: BT (75cl)
RP/WA: 85
Available: In bond
Drink: Now - 2028
Chapelle de Potensac
Tasting Notes:

The second wine, the 2010 La Chapelle de Potensac, has more Merlot in the blend and is surprisingly fruity and soft. A bistro quaffer to be drunk uncritically with a steak au poivre or coq au vin, it can be enjoyed over the next 3-5 years.


Leave it to Jean-Hubert Delon to make a second wine from his northern frontier territory of Potensac, for decades one of the most reliable and value-priced wines of Bordeaux.

Robert Parker, Wine Advocate (205)
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Bordeaux Appellation MapThe name ‘moulis’ derives from the French for windmills or “moulins”. Like the Listrac appellation the nearby pine forest serves as a ward against the prevailing winds. However, unlike Listrac wines those produced here have a silkier and less tannic quality. As a result Moulis wines can be drunk earlier than is typical in the Medoc. The soils compose of a series of gravel terraces with segments of silt and limestone.

Though the commune has no classed growth properties, the fine Cru Bourgeois estate of Chateau Poujeaux gives rise to wines of staggering quality. Another flagship of this all too easily overlooked region is Chateau Chasse-Spleen, which also produces wines that belie its underdog status.

Soil: Three layers of gravel over a base of limestone. Clay can also be found.
Size: 550 hectares
Output: approx 4,200,000 bottles a year.
Type of wine produced: Smooth, velvety reds
Grapes: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc

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Vintage Overview

One phrase which is being used increasingly to describe the 2010 vintage is ‘embarrassingly good.’ Given how 2009 was lauded to the heavens by the bordelaise as ‘the best ever’, it’s something of an awkward truth that – a mere twelve months later - we are faced once more with awe-inspiring quality. A due sense of cynicism is to be expected, but this mustn’t interfere with our appreciation of what is, quite objectively, a fabulous vintage.

Not that this came as a sudden surprise, as Bill Blatch (Bordeaux expert and negociant) notes: “Back in November, many owners were already quietly confident that their ’10 was better than the already legendary ’09 but, coming hot on the heels of the hallowed 2009s, they seemed embarrassed to say it too loudly. Today, half of Bordeaux is less timid in assessing ’10 as great as, if not greater than ’09.” He adds, “There is one point of total agreement: It is totally different from its predecessor.”

What we appear to have is more of a stylistic shift, while the quality has remained essentially static in its excellence. This quality isn’t reserved to the top tiers of Bordeaux producers, either. David Peppercorn MW observes that wines are attractive at all levels, from lesser properties all the way up to Grand Crus: “Those with lesser sites have made excellent wines.” He added that he would be quite happy to list many of them as everyday wines at the prestigious West End Garrick Club, where he sits on the wine committee.

The Reds

These are not wines for the faint-hearted, and in their excellence they are uncompromising. The average alcohol level is 14.5 per cent, peaking at 15.5 per cent in some cases. In addition, pH values are very low, acidity is obviously very high, and the tannins are formidable (ensuring fantastic ageing potential.)

Overall, these are ripe, dense wines packed with sweet fruit notes such as raspberry, strawberry and black cherry. Some are so richly flavourful that they take on a delicious ‘pruney’ dimension. Ordinarily this would be overpowering, but the keen balancing acidity keeps everything in check.

There is also what we might call a ‘rustic’ edge to many of these reds, in contrast to the silky voluptuousness of the 2009s. This is due to a searing hit of green tannins, which will develop and imbue the wine with steadily greater structure and balance.

Cabernet Sauvignon and Franc were generally picked in near-perfect conditions during the gloriously dry conditions of mid-October.


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